Vignette

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In theater script and poetry writing, vignettes are short, impressionistic scenes that focus on one moment or give a trenchant impression about a character, an idea, or a setting. This type of scene is more common in recent postmodern theater, where adherence to the conventions of theatrical structure and story development are jettisoned. It is particularly influenced by contemporary notions of a scene as shown in film, video and television scripting.

Unlike the traditional scene in a play, the vignette is not strictly linked in with a sequential plot development but establishes meaning through loose symbolic or linguistic connection to other vignettes or scenes. Vignettes are the literary equivalent of a snapshot, often incomplete or fragmentary. In poetry, in the quintain form, they can relate to a short descriptive literary sketch or a short scene or incident from a movie or play. The use of vignettes is suited to those plays in which theme, image, emotion and character are more important than narrative, though this doesn't mean that a vignette is out of place as an element in a more narrative play.

The term "vignette" is also used in literature for a work of written fiction that is very short in length, often under 1,500 words. Often such a work depicts a single scene or event, but has little plot as such. However, such "vignettes" may have more plot and be closer to traditional story forms than the theatrical or poetic vignettes.

In spanking literature, the entries in the Summer Story Contest are generally vignettes in length, although many have complete, if brief, plots. Funbun is known for the vignettes that accompany his drawings.

The Victorian era sex-and-birching novel "Frank" and I (1902) describes flagellatory brothels in London and Paris that featured staged vignettes called tableaux vivants. In these, prostitutes would dress up in costumes and perform whipping scenarios from other times and places for the amusement of their clients.

Vignetting[edit]

In photographs and other images, vignetting is a reduction of an image's brightness or saturation at the periphery compared to the image center. This can be used for artistic effect and/or for a vintage look. Vignetting techniques can also be used in non-photographic artwork, as in the following example.

See also[edit]


Smallwikipedialogo.png This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Vignette. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with Spanking Art, the text of Wikipedia is available under a copyleft license, the Creative Commons Attribution Sharealike license.
Smallwikipedialogo.png This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Vignetting. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with Spanking Art, the text of Wikipedia is available under a copyleft license, the Creative Commons Attribution Sharealike license.