Thailand

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Thailand, officially the Kingdom of Thailand (Thai: ราชอาณาจักรไทย), and formerly known as Siam, is a country in Southeast Asia. It has a population of around 65 million and is among the most populous countries in the world. Its capital and its largest city is Bangkok. Its official language is Thai. Thailand is a constitutional monarchy, with King Rama IX (who has ruled since 1946) as the head of state and the Prime Minister as the head of government.

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[edit] Spanking in Thailand

[edit] Prison corporal punishment

Anecdotal evidence suggests that prison corporal punishment is practiced in some reformatories in Thailand. The Training Arrangement for Certain Groups of Children Act (1936) permits whipping up to 10 strokes for juveniles in reform schools. The implement used is some kind of rod, and is supposed not to exceed 75cm in length and 0.5cm in diameter.[1]

An official paper, from around 1997, stated that caning (maximum 20 strokes, under medical supervision) was legal for male prisoners who defy prison regulations. However, this was not used in practice as the document also said that there was no corporal punishment.[2]

[edit] Military corporal punishment

Soldiers receive light caning in the Royal Thai Army for minor offences. This military corporal punishment is performed similar to canings in Thai schools (see below).

[edit] School corporal punishment

School corporal punishment (in the form of caning) was abolished in 2000, reintroduced in 2002, and then banned entirely in 2005, based on regulations from the Thai Ministry of Education.

Despite so, there is evidence that school corporal punishment is still common and accepted in practice. No action is usually taken unless a complaint is made, and some parents seem to support school corporal punishment. Video clips (see below) show both schoolboys and schoolgirls being caned together in a group in the classroom, often in a light-hearted situation where the students (and sometimes the teachers) are seen laughing. However, there was a serious case in August 2010 which attracted a lot of media attention, and the teacher who caned the students was later charged in court and fined.[3]

In October 2008, it was reported that the Thai government was considering reintroducing caning at college and university as there was an increase in violence and disorder among students.[4] A poll conducted in 2011 found that 54% of respondents were in favour of a recommendation by the Students' Council that caning should be reintroduced.[5]

Caning in Thai schools is similar to that in Malaysia, as the student adopts a standing position, either facing a wall or with their arms folded in front, and is beaten on the bottom over their school uniform trousers or skirt. The punishment is often conducted in front of the class, as seen in those video clips. Occasionally, students are caned on the hand (hand caning) with a ruler or small paddle.

[edit] See also

[edit] References

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