South Korea

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Note: This article is about a country. For other meanings, see Korea.

South Korea, officially the Republic of Korea (Hangul: 대한민국), is a country in East Asia on the southern half of the Korean Peninsula. It has a population of about 50 million and its official language is Korean. Its capital and largest city is Seoul.

Korean was traditionally ruled by monarchies (or dynasties) from around 2300 BC to 1910, after which it was annexed by Japan for more than 30 years. In 1945, at the end of World War II, the northern and southern parts of Korea were liberated and occupied by the Soviet Union and the United States respectively. South Korea was established in 1948. The Korean War was fought between North and South Korea from 1950 to 1953 over a conflict of political ideologies (the North is communist while the South is capitalist). The war ended in 1953, but there is still high tension between the two Koreas even today.

South Korea is now a highly developed country with very high standards of living. It also has the fourth largest economy in Asia and has strong influence in the region. It is governed by a presidential republic, with the President as the head of state and the Prime Minister as the head of government.

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[edit] Spanking in South Korea

[edit] Judicial corporal punishment

Judicial corporal punishment in Korea (see here for another photo).

Judicial corporal punishment was common in ancient Korea and was applied to both men and women. For males, the offender was tied to a low whipping bench in a lying position and was beaten with a type of long paddle on the bare buttocks. Women received the punishment over wet clothing. In a variant, called gonjang (곤장), the bench was in the shape of a horizontal cross and the delinquent's arms were strapped to the sides such that he assumed a face-down spreadeagle position. See here for some photos.

[edit] School corporal punishment

School corporal punishment, applied to both boys and girls, is widely practiced in South Korea as of now. Opinions on school corporal punishment are divided in the country, with some calling for it to be banned while others oppose its abolition. According to a study conducted in 2003, 70% of South Korean schools permit their teachers to use corporal punishment.

Traditionally, parents ceremonially present their children's teachers with symbolic canes ("stick of love") at the beginning of the school year, signifying a handing-over of responsibility for the discipline of their sons and daughters to the school. However, these 'canes' are not exactly canes, as they appear to be very thick and rigid sticks rather than the typical thin and whippy rattan cane traditionally used in Britain, and now in Southeast Asia. These 'canes' are highly like to cause bruises rather than stings if applied with force.

The official rules on the use of school corporal punishment are as such:

  • For elementary and middle school students, the cane is up to 1 cm (0.39 ″) thick and only 50 cm (1 ft 8 in) long. The former may receive up to five strokes while the latter may receive ten.
  • For high school students, the maximum number of strokes is still ten, but the cane used is 1.5 cm (0.59 ″) thick and 60 cm (2.0 ′) long.
  • Boys are to be punished on the buttocks while girls are to be punished on the thighs.

Although rules and regulations have been stated, teachers sometimes violate them and the government does not really enforce them, and abuse cases are quite common. Some teachers use larger sticks to punish students, and sometimes they are seen punching students with fists and hitting them on the head. Mass punishments, where many students are punished together, are very common in schools.

During the punishment, the student usually adopts a lunge position (or push-up position) and receives the beating on his or her bottom over clothing. In other cases, the student may bend over a desk or a chair (as in the traditional British style), or stands upright, or kneels on the floor or on a chair. Hand-canings, beatings on the back, front and back of the thighs, bare calves, or foot-whipping, are also not uncommon. The implement used may not necessarily be the thick and rigid stick all the time, as teachers sometimes may use club-like sticks, broomsticks, paddles or baseball bats.

[edit] Domestic spanking

For the punishment of children, spanking of the buttocks is common, but also hitting the child's calves. The calves are spanked with an implement such as a cane, called hoichori (회초리). Calf-spanking seems to be a particularly Korean thing.

Children are spanked at home (80% of South Korean parents say they physically discipline their children).

[edit] South Korean spanking art

South Korean spanking artists include Eingyeo.

[edit] Punishment and bondage films with Korean actresses

In the pornography industry there are a great many Korean and Korean-American actresses who have made a name for themselves by performing in X-rated sex films. A few have also dabbled in fetish videos involving bondage and spanking scenarios.

In the 1980s and '90s, an actress named Mische (sometimes spelled Meechi or Mishi) did a series of CP videos for Nu-West/Leda Productions. These titles include: Harwood School for Girls, Ann Bowman Spanks Michshe and Kyrie (both co-starring Kiri Kelly), Mische and the Policewoman and Stephanie's Plaything - Mische. She also starred in A Paddling for Meechi for California Star.

[edit] Links

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