Primary school

From Spanking Art
A Swiss 19th century school.

A primary school, also known as elementary school, grade school, or preparatory schools (depending on location or status), is a main institution where children receive the first stage of compulsory education. Some parents elect to home school instead. Children generally attend primary school from around the age of four or five until the age of eleven or twelve (see schoolchild).

The major goals of primary education are achieving basic literacy and numeracy amongst all pupils, as well as establishing foundations in science, geography, physical education, the arts (drawing, music etc), history and other social sciences. The relative priority of various areas, and the methods used to teach them, are an area of considerable political debate.

Organization[edit]

Children are normally organized in classes based on the the school year they reached their starting age. The normally stay with the same group of children as long as they are in the same school, unless academic performance changes this, or the school is large enough to support more than one class per year group. Each class typically only has one teacher and classroom which will normally change each year, though a specialist teachers might take the class for some lessons especially for subject like second language or music. While the will normally on interact with their own class during lessons, during class breaks (recess, lunch, afternoon-break) the will share the schoolyard with other class. Due to size and developmental reason some primary schools might divide the schoolyard bounds into younger and older students.

Some schools might combine the primary school with an intermediate school, such students might not move unto their next school until thirteen or fourteen.

Primary schools and spanking[edit]

A teacher applying the ruler to a student's backside.

In primary schools where school corporal punishment is (or was) used, its application might closer resemble domestic disciplinary spanking with the child over the lap of the teacher receiving a spanking with the hand, ruler, paddle or the strap. Though, particularly with older students, the chastisement might be over a desk instead, or in the bent-over position (hands on knees or ankles). In some cultures, school corporal punishment also often included (or still includes) the strap, cane or ruler given to the student's hand instead of their bottoms (see striking the hand). Even when a class teacher can use such punishments themselves, sometimes the still send the naughty child to the Principal's Office, and this is considered a higher sanction.

Non-corporal methods of punishment in primary school include writing lines, or detentions during recess or most of lunch (with some time left so the child can still eat but not play).

In certain countries such as the U.S., it is also not uncommon to celebrate the tradition of birthday spanking at primary school, the birthday child going over their teacher's lap in front of the class for a symbolic/fun spanking.

See also[edit]


Smallwikipedialogo.png This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Primary school. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with Spanking Art, the text of Wikipedia is available under a copyleft license, the Creative Commons Attribution Sharealike license.
Smallwikipedialogo.png This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Primary education. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with Spanking Art, the text of Wikipedia is available under a copyleft license, the Creative Commons Attribution Sharealike license.