Landmark Publications

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PUBLISHER
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Imprints Anville Press
Founded 1939
Country USA
Location Chamberlain
Genres Superhero
Notable Victory Girl

Landmark Comics, aka Anville Press, Goldman Periodicals and Global Distributions, is the fictitious publisher of the Landmark Universe and its associated properties. Ostensibly based in Empire City, Chamberlain, it is host to a wide variety of webcomic characters including Selina the Moon Maiden, Victory Girl and Glory Bee. Debuting on MSN Groups in 2004, the site was initially founded to provide open source material to the online gaming community, quickly branching out into art and animation via Google, Yahoo and Wikia.

Faux history[edit]

Landmark Publications was founded in January 1939 under the name Anville Press, one of a large number of fly-by-night operations attempting to cash in on the rising popularity of the comic book medium. Amongst its earliest titles were Big Thrill and Razzle-Dazzle, obscure humor anthologies featuring newpaper reprints. Neither book fared particularly well on the newsstand, although a later addition, Holy Moley! enjoyed increasing success during the war years.

Anville merged with rival publisher Goldman Periodicals in June 1940, adding a new line-up to the regular cast, the most prominent being Major Triumph and Flash Harry Doolin. The newly formed company expanded into the market under both the Anville and Goldman logos for seven months, before finally settling on the Landmark indicia in February 1941. By this time, increased sales allowed Holy Moley! alumni Glory Bee and Victory Girl to be spun off into their own magazines.

Throughout the 1940s, the company struggled to maintain its position against DC and Timely, particularly after superheroes went out of fashion at the end of the war. As the decade drew to a close, Landmark experimented with numerous genres, including teenaged humor, romance, crime and western. None of these proved especially durable, although Glory Bee and Kooky Girls Comics began to hold their own against better known competitors.