Cursing

From Spanking Art

Cursing (also referred to as "swearing" or "cussing") is the act of using profane oaths or language.

Children begin such behaviour often at a very young age when they learn cursing vocabulary for the first time and are anxious to experiment with it. Depending on their age, the case at hand, the strictness and standards of their parents or other caretakers, and previous measures taken, they will possibly get punished, or just reprimanded, or will suffer no consequences at all for cursing. While adults are typically allowed more leeway in cursing than children, (over-)use of profane words can also have negative consequences up to an old age.

An offshoot of cursing is speaking blasphemously (e.g., "taking the Lord's name in vain"). Though the specific words used may not be considered profane, using them in an irreverent or impious context may result in the punishments named above.

Punishment for cursing[edit]

For children in Western countries such as the U.S. or Britain, the most traditional punishment for cursing is mouthsoaping, although a spanking is also a frequent result of this behavior. In many instances, both methods of punishment are administered.

Punishment for cursing is also a common scenario in roleplay (especially ageplay), particularly in a domestic discipline environment.

Example in mainstream film:

  • In A Christmas Story (1983) a boy gets a mouthwashing from his mother for saying a swearword. Asked where he has learned that word, he can't say the truth (which is: from his father) and instead blames his classmate. His mother then rings his classmate's mother and we can hear a spanking on the telephone (off screen).

Examples from spanking videos:

Thesaurus[edit]

  • profanity
  • vulgarism
  • rudeness
  • swearing
  • cussing
  • expletive
  • oath
  • bad word
  • dirty word
  • potty mouth
  • strong language
  • irreverent language
  • obscene language
  • blasphemous language
  • foul mouthedness

See also[edit]


Smallwikipedialogo.png This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Profanity. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with Spanking Art, the text of Wikipedia is available under a copyleft license, the Creative Commons Attribution Sharealike license.