Classroom

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A primary school classroom

A classroom, also known as a schoolroom, is a room set aside for lessons. Classrooms are normally found in a school where they might be dedicated to a particular teacher, subject, or class, depending on the structure of the school.

Classrooms can also be found in other places other than schools, such as corporate offices for employees to receive training, or large homes where children are home-schooled, or take extra tutoring.

Typical equipment[edit]

Schoolgirl about to be paddled from "Final Exam", a film by User:Jameslovebirch. Video clip.
A pile of student slates under the teacher's cane.

Classrooms traditionally have simplified desks without drawers (modern models include one-piece aluminum-frame designs with attached chairs) arranged in straight rows for the students to sit facing a large blackboard, whiteboard, or projection screen. Underneath the blackboard, elementary school classrooms often had a platform for shorter pupils to mount when writing on the blackboard.

Teachers use large office-style desks that are usually at the front of the classroom facing the students. In addition (or instead of the teacher's desk) there may be a lectern (most common up to the 19th century). Alternative classroom layouts such as arranging desks a semi-circle, are sometimes used to make the setting less hierarchical and more group focused.

Classrooms also tend to be decorated with material that will work as study aids with primary topics taught in the room, such as educational maps, charts, models, and a globe of the world.

In Antiquity, students wrote on clay or wax slates. In the 19th century and into the 20th century, young students would write with styluses on small slates that were like a personal version of the blackboard. Eventually they advanced to writing on paper, in single sheets or bound in notebooks, with pencil, and later, ink. Before the advent of modern pens and markers, old-style wooden desks once came with holes for an inkwell (see second photo in gallery section below).

Classrooms and spanking[edit]

A teacher uses a yardstick on a student. (Ostra Studio, c. 1935).

Classrooms are a common location for public spankings due to the long history of school corporal punishment. While such punishments could be administered at the student's desk, it was more common for the individual to be called to the front of the classroom to receive their chastisement in a more formalized manner. This was deemed a more effective way of making an example of the student before the rest of the class as well as increasing the individual's humiliation.

Some classroom punishments are performed with pervertibles such as a ruler, yardstick, blackboard pointer, or a plimsoll. However, many schools were once stocked with an array of dedicated spanking implements. This includes the birch, cane, paddle, strap, rug beater, and leather tawse. Usually the spanking implement, when not in use, was kept in a safe place such as in a drawer of the teacher's desk or in a wardrobe. Occasionally it was hung on the wall, to be in quick reach when needed and also to be in view, serving as a reminder through the in sight, in mind principle.

Classrooms can also be used for private spankings, if the appointment is made during class breaks or after school. Punishments can also take place in rooms set aside for detention or study hall periods.

Spanking videos[edit]

Different types of desk and chair combinations, from antique to modern, have been used for set decoration in spanking videos to invoke a feel of authenticity as well as nostalgia for the past. Below are a few examples.

  • Classroom Detention Spanking (Spanking Sorority Girls), modern steel and plastic desk-chair one-piece, photos
  • Veronica & Paris Spanked in Class (Spanking Sorority Girls), modern one-piece design, photos

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

Links[edit]